Beginners Outing to Braeside Park

27 March 2021
Leaders: Hazel and Alan Veevers
Photographer: Eleanor Dilley
Species count: 57
Dusky Moorhen

Twenty-three members gathered at the Southern Carpark in light rain and observed a small flock of Red-rumped Parrots at the top of a dead tree. Noisy Miners were evident throughout the park making it challenging to find any smaller bushbirds. Walking clockwise around the wetlands, we were delighted to find a lot of bird life on the water. This despite the noise from major roadworks along the perimeter of the park. A lone Dusky Moorhen, hiding in the reeds, watched as three Purple Swamphens marched imperiously by.

Purple Swamphens
Blue-billed Duck (m)

Nine different duck species were seen, with several (male) Blue-billed ducks being the highlight.

Great Egret

Numerous Australasian Darters, Australian Pelicans, a Great Egret and a Royal Spoonbill were among the other waterbirds seen.

Australasian Darters
Australian Pelican

There was great excitement when a Grey Goshawk in the White Morph was found, perched on a stump further along the track. Members approached cautiously and were rewarded with great views of this magnificent raptor.

Grey Goshawk White Morph

Soon afterwards a Swamp Harrier flew across the area causing a great commotion amongst the other birds. A few people saw an unusual parrot flying fast yet gracefully over the Park, first one way then back again in the opposite direction. Photographic evidence enabled it to be identified as a Superb Parrot (most likely an aviary escapee?).

Superb Parrot

By this time, the rain had eased and gradually the sun appeared. It was good to see that the glass in the bird-hide had been cleaned, enabling members to get great views of a pair of Pink-eared Ducks with several fluffy youngsters just outside the window.

Pink-eared Ducks with chicks

A further highlight from the hide occurred when a Brown Goshawk landed on a nearby branch. The next stop was at a smaller pond where more than a dozen cormorants were perched on a fallen log and a large vertical stag provided a resting place for yet more Australasian Darters.

Little Pied Cormorants

Lunch was eaten back near the cars after which most of the members drove to the northern end of the park and took a short walk along the Heathland Trail. Near the children’s playground two well camouflaged Tawny Frogmouths were located perched in a track-side tree not far above head height. Very few other bushbirds were seen, presumably due to the ever-present bullying Noisy Miners. 

Crested Pigeon

Two Crested Pigeons were found sunning themselves on the grass beside the path back towards the cars. The Tawny Frogmouths were again much admired as we passed by them again. One of them gave us a large yawn, as if to bid us goodbye, revealing the bright yellow inside of its beak. 

Tawny Frogmouth

This concluded a most rewarding and enjoyable day with a total of 57 species recorded.

A huge thankyou to Eleanor Dilley who, in rain or shine, captured all the images in the Report.

View the complete bird list:

2 thoughts on “Beginners Outing to Braeside Park

    1. Dear Jason
      Thank you for showing an interest in the outings. You will be able to get the details of forthcoming Beginners Outings from the BirdLife Melbourne website:http://www.birdlifemelbourne.org.au/activities/. If you would like to attend a Beginners Outing, you should just be able to turn up and that will be fine or you can get further information from Hazel on (03) 9876 3712.
      If you would like to attend any of the other outings listed, it might be best to advise the listed contact.
      Kind regards, Adriana

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