Beginners Outing to Woodlands Historic Park

26 June 2021

Leaders: Hazel and Alan Veevers

Species Count: 40

Fortunately, the Covid restrictions were relaxed just in time for the Beginners outing to Woodlands Historic Park. The Park is famous for many reasons, including ancient trees, Eastern Grey Kangaroos and, our main interest, red Robins. 

Eastern Grey Kangaroos. Photo by Eleanor Dilley

Thirty-five members started the morning walk, following the creek that winds between the old and much-admired River Red Gums. Red-rumped Parrots, Crimson Rosellas and Rainbow Lorikeets were amongst those taking advantage of the numerous nesting hollows the ancient trees provided. 

Superb Fairy-wrens were seen in good numbers foraging at the side of the track while both Striated and Spotted Pardalotes, together with Weebills, were much higher up in the trees. Near the homestead a Brown Falcon, which was the only raptor recorded for the morning, was spotted flying overhead.

After lunch most of the group drove down Providence Road to the Cemetery carpark on a quest for Robins. This section of Woodlands is known to be an ideal area for seeing them, for those with patience, persistence, and a good deal of luck. To everyone’s delight some were sighted in the area between the road and the dam. First, both male and female Scarlet Robins were spotted low down amongst thickets of young trees. Whilst observing them, a pair of Flame Robins appeared in the same area.

The group stayed there for some time enjoying watching and photographing them. A Grey Shrike-thrush, a Grey Fantail and a Little Eagle were seen nearby. 

Everyone then continued towards the gate to the fenced Back Paddock which was due to be open for the first time in many months. Just outside the gate a male Red-capped Robin was perched in a young tree, as if awaiting our arrival, with his brilliant red plumage shining in the sun.  A walk, longer than planned, was undertaken inside the fence, hoping for more sightings.  Sadly, very few birds were seen, though some in the middle of the group saw a male Rufous Whistler and a Yellow Thornbill.

Back at the carpark some of the group stayed on for a while longer and were well rewarded when a flock of 30+ Yellow-tailed Black-Cockatoos flew low overhead, shortly followed by the brief appearance of a male Rose Robin!  This was a fantastic conclusion to a wonderful day with 4 different red Robin species recorded out of a grand total of 40 for the outing!

Thanks to Eleanor Dilley and Steve Hoptroff for contributing their splendid photographs.

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