Beginners Outing to Pound Bend

26 November 2022

Leaders: Hazel and Alan Veevers

Species count: 50

Thirty-two members gathered in glorious sunshine at Pound Bend Carpark and were greeted by lots of birds, both heard and seen, in the surrounding area. A variety of parrots were feeding on the grass, including Little and Long-billed Corellas, Sulphur-crested Cockatoos and Galahs, as well as  Australian Wood Ducks with chicks. 

Little Corella. Photo by Eleanor Dilley
Long-billed Corellas. Photo by Eleanor Dilley
Wood Duck and chicks. Photo by Eleanor Dilley
Sulphur-crested Cockatoos. Photo by Eleanor Dilley

Setting off along the riverside track it was interesting to see the Yarra in full spate after the recent heavy rains. There were many highlights along the track such as an Eastern Yellow Robin sitting on a nest close to the path. It seemed very vulnerable as there were Pied Currawongs, looking threatening, nearby.

Eastern Yellow Robin on nest. Photo by Steve Hoptroff
Eastern Yellow Robins. Photo by Steve Hoptroff

A pair of Common Bronzewings came into view walking along the track ahead of us with their wings shining in the sunlight. Seemingly oblivious to our presence they sauntered on, eventually taking wing and disappearing into the bush. Gang-gang Cockatoos and King parrots were among the more unusual birds spotted near the end of the riverside track. 

Male Bronzewing following female. Photo by Eleanor Dilley
White-faced Heron on nest. Photo by Eleanor Dilley

A short circuit walk away from the river was unproductive. However, on regaining the riverside track, a White-faced Heron was spotted standing on its nest in a tall Manna Gum on a small island in the river. Further along, a Laughing Kookaburra was perched, manipulating a large frog in its beak. It quickly flew to a nest hollow, presumably to feed its mate and/or its chicks.

Laughing Kookaburra. Photo by Steve Hoptroff
Sacred Kingfisher. Photo by Steve Hoptroff

Just before the end of the walk a Sacred Kingfisher was heard and eventually located on a fallen tree in the river.  No Cormorants or Darters were seen, maybe because the river was flowing so rapidly that it would have been hard for them to feed. Many of the expected bush birds were heard but not many were so readily seen. Olive-backed Oriole, Fan-tailed Cuckoo and Shining Bronze-Cuckoo came into the latter category. Good views of Superb Fairy-wren and White-browed Scrubwren were obtained by a section of the group in the right place at the right time.

Superb Fairy-wren, female. Photo by Steve Hoptroff
White-browed Scrubwren. Photo by Steve Hoptroff

After lunch a short walk was taken to the tunnel exit which was a dramatic sight with water gushing through very fast.  No further birds were seen to add to the morning’s total of 50 species. It had been an enjoyable walk in ideal conditions, particularly so for a few members for whom it was their first visit.

Thanks to Eleanor Dilley and Steve Hoptroff for, once again, supplying the excellent photographs.

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