Tag Archives: Crested Pigeon

Beginners Outing to Braeside Park

22 April 2017
Leaders: Hazel and Alan Veevers; Species count: 57
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Noisy Miner. Photo by Merrilyn Serong

Twenty-six members gathered on a sunny morning at the Ibis carpark where Noisy Miners certainly lived up to their name. They were the dominant species in that area, chasing away any other bush bird that dared to enter their territory. A Little Eagle circling overhead provided an exciting diversion as the group were just about to set off down the main drive towards the wetlands. It was not easy to identify for certain until a long-range photograph (attached) was examined on the camera.

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Little Eagle. Photo by Eleanor Dilley

The old dead trees, scattered amongst the lush live ones, enabled good views to be had of Red-rumped Parrots and Rainbow Lorikeets as they investigated the many available nesting hollows.

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Rainbow Lorikeets. Photo by Alan Veevers

A few Crested Pigeons appeared, feeding in the grasslands alongside the track. Another raptor was seen but, after much discussion, it was decided that it was, again, a dark morph Little Eagle.

Crested Pigeon, Braeside
Crested Pigeon. Photo by Eleanor Dilley

Walking round the wetlands in an anticlockwise direction, a hotspot was found by a shallow muddy pool.

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Golden-headed Cisticola. Photo by Alan Veevers

Here were Golden-headed Cisticolas, female Flame Robins, Red-browed Finches and numerous Superb Fairy-wrens. It took a further hour-and-a-half before a male Flame Robin was spotted by a sharp-eyed observer!

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Female Flame Robin. Photo by Alan Veevers

There was a plentiful supply of Ducks to be seen on the main ponds, where the water levels were encouragingly high. Highlights were Blue-billed Ducks, Australasian Shovelers, Hardheads and a relatively large number of Pink-eared Ducks.

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Pink-eared Ducks and Hardheads. Photo by Merrilyn Serong

Little Pied, Little Black and Great Cormorants, together with White-faced Herons, Australian White Ibis and Australasian Darters were also present.

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Australian White Ibis and Little Pied Cormorant. Photo by Merrilyn Serong

At the edge of the wetlands a flock of Silvereyes perched on low bushes created a beautiful sight as the sun shone on their feathers. Members then returned to the Ibis carpark for lunch.

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Little Black Cormorant. Photo by Alan Veevers

A short afternoon walk began at the Visitor Centre and explored the mixed bushland in the vicinity. The first sighting, much to everyone’s delight, was a pair of Tawny Frogmouths resting in typical fashion on a low branch of a nearby tree.

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Tawny Frogmouths. Photo by Merrilyn Serong

Continuing along the Heathland Trail, both Grey and Chestnut Teal accompanied by Dusky Moorhens were seen in a small pond. A final productive area, amongst River Red Gums, was encountered before we made our way back to the cars. This yielded Golden Whistler, White-browed Scrubwren, White-plumed Honeyeater and a very colourful flock of Spotted Pardalotes.

White-plumed Honeyeeater, Braeside
White-plumed Honeyeater. Photo by Eleanor Dilley

After the bird count, it was agreed that it had been a very rewarding day with 57 species recorded.

See complete bird list for the day: BM Apr 2017 Bird List Braeside Park

Weekdays Outing to Newport Lakes and Jawbone Reserve

5 April 2017
mix of birds on an inlet - Graeme Dean
On an islet in Jawbone – Immature Little Pied Cormorant, Royal Spoonbill, (partly hidden) Chestnut Teal and a Little Pied Cormorant. Photo by Graeme Dean

The morning was perfect for birding, calm, clear and mild, as our 19 assembled. Our number included Jennifer, a birder over from the USA for a month.

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Crested Pigeon. Photo by Diane Tweeddale

Hazel Veevers led the group once we could discipline ourselves to leave the car park where, as usual, the birding was rewarding and effortless. There were Red Wattlebirds, Crested Pigeons, Superb Fairy-wrens, Musk Lorikeets, New Holland Honeyeaters and House Sparrows in numbers with Rainbow Lorikeets, Little Ravens and Magpie-larks somewhat fewer.

New Holland Honeyeater - Graeme Dean
New Holland Honeyeater. Photo by Graeme Dean

The main lake had both Australasian and Hoary-headed Grebes in considerable numbers. Welcome Swallows soared above the canopy and over the water.

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‘Belligerent’ Welcome Swallow. Photo by Graeme Dean

Walking further we noted the amphitheatre was very popular with Superb Fairy-wrens and honeyeaters foraging in and under the trees. The only raptor of the day was recorded here – two Brown Goshawks interacted very briefly before disappearing behind the trees. Eurasian Coots and Purple Swamphens were present on all lakes but Dusky Moorhens were only present later at Jawbone. Spotted Pardalotes called and finally one allowed us to glimpse him among the foliage, delighting all and especially those who hadn’t seen one before. Flowering trees each attracted several species of bird and therefore also attracted the attention of birdwatchers.

Common Greenshank - Black-winged Stilt - Graeme Dean
Common Greenshank and Black-winged Stilt. Photo by Graeme Dean

Back for lunch which was interrupted with a quiet call of “Robin”. The “sparrow” on the path was actually a female Flame Robin which stayed around long enough for all to achieve good views. The lakes reserve had a bird count of 34 species.

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Crossing at Newport Lake. Photo by Diane Tweeddale

We drove down to Jawbone where the bird count mounted quickly. Waterbirds were numerous though a scope was an asset when identifying those on the distant sand bar. A highlight here was an Arctic Jaeger unsuccessfully attacking a Silver Gull and being harassed in its turn.

Red-kneed Dotterel - Graeme Dean
Red-kneed Dotterel. Photo by Graeme Dean

Black Swans and Silver Gulls were numerous but there were other species in smaller numbers – Pied, Little Pied and Little Black Cormorants, Royal Spoonbills, Australian Pied Oystercatchers, Australian White Ibis, White-faced Heron, Crested Terns, the list continued with both Grey and Chestnut Teal, Common Greenshanks and a small flock of Red-kneed Dotterels quite close to the hide.

Pond by housing at Jawbone
Pond by housing at Jawbone. Photo by Diane Tweeddale

We counted nine duck species as well as the ubiquitous grebes and numbers of swans on the pond near the houses. It was good to record Pink-eared, Bluebill, Australasian Shoveler and Musk Duck as well as the more familiar species.

Pink-eared Ducks - Graeme Dean
Pink-eared Ducks. Photo by Graeme Dean

A Great Egret by the far bank was clearly having success with its fishing and a small flotilla of grebes moved closer to it, possibly to join the hunt.

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Great Egret. Photo by Graeme Dean.

Time to call it a day and count the Jawbone species. Here we recorded 56 species and calculated the day’s total as 64 species. It had been a good day’s birding with good views of many species and we thanked Hazel for introducing some and reintroducing others to this area.

Diane Tweeddale coordinator BirdLife Melbourne weekdays outings

Beginners Outing to Braeside Park

23 July 2016
Leaders: Hazel and Alan Veevers; Species Count: 51

Twenty-four members braved a chilly morning and a dismal weather forecast to meet at Braeside Park, where they were greeted by very loud Noisy Miners which were by far the most dominant of the bushland species. Setting off from the Visitor Centre towards the Heathland Track, three Little Eagles circled overhead. It was clear that one of them was in the light morph and another in the dark morph.

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Noisy Miner. Photo by Merrilyn Serong

Several Eastern Rosellas and Grey Butcherbirds were near the path and at the small wetlands both Chestnut and Grey Teals were seen. In the nearby bush was a ‘hotspot’ where both male and female Scarlet Robins were observed feeding, along with an Eastern Yellow Robin, a male Golden Whistler and a Spotted Pardalote.

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Male Chestnut Teal. Photo by Merrilyn Serong

The members then walked down the main drive towards the Ranger Station unsuccessfully seeking a Tawny Frogmouth known to have previously been in that region. However, they did see a male Red-rumped Parrot, Cattle Egrets, Striated Pardalotes and Crested Pigeons. Returning via the Howard Road Track a flock of Red-browed Finches were observed for some time foraging in the mown grass alongside the path.

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Crested Pigeon. Photo by Merrilyn Serong

Lunch by the Visitor Centre was nearly finished when the forecast rain began to fall. Despite this, half the group stayed on for the afternoon walk at the Woodland Road Environmental Wetlands, a short drive away. Several species were added there, including Black Swan, Australasian Grebe and Dusky Moorhen. A male Australian Darter was seen catching and eating a fish as the rain increased in intensity. Several members left at this point, but the six who continued were rewarded with great views of Hardheads, more Grebes, a Nankeen Kestrel, and even the sun.

A total of 51 species were recorded for the day – very good for a suburban park on a cold winter’s day.

See the full bird list: BM July 2016 Bird List Braeside Park