Tag Archives: Little Pied Cormorant

Beginners’ Outing to Lysterfield Park

23 April 2022

Leader: Robert Grosvenor

Number of species: 40

Thirty one birders arrived at Lysterfield Park for the Beginners’ outing on a sunny, calm day, perfect for birding.  While in the carpark, we were assailed by numerous Rainbow Lorikeets and Little Ravens, and then the familiar call of Gang Gangs announced their presence.  This was followed by fleeting views of Crimson and Eastern Rosellas.

Gang-gang Cockatoos. Photo by Kathie Thomas
Beginners’ group. Photo by Kathie Thomas

At the start of the walk around the lake it was very quiet with nothing flying or calling apart from a lone Red Wattlebird.  Fortunately things improved further along the track and while stopped to see an Eastern Rosella, we added Superb Fairy Wrens, a small flock of Red-browed Finches, a Brown Thornbill and a lovely Eastern Spinebill which came in very close giving good views.  Just a short distance ahead we luckily found a pair of well camouflaged Tawny Frogmouths, one of which was in the classical Tawny pose.

Superb Fairy-wren. Photo by Kathie Thomas
Tawny Frogmouth. Photo by Eleanor Dilley

A diversion off the established track led us to a jetty on the lake where we saw Little Black and Little Pied Cormorants.  Both male and female Musk Ducks were also seen here together with a flotilla of Eurasian Coots.

Little Pied and Little Black Cormorants. Photo by Kathie Thomas
Musk Duck, female. Photo by Steve Hoptroff

The lack of flowering trees and shrubs contributed to the dearth of Honeyeaters but we managed to obtain good looks at a White-eared Honeyeater.  Another diversion down to the water’s edge added Silver Gulls and very good views of a Spotted Pardalote.

White-eared Honeyeater. Photo by Steve Hoptroff
Brush Bronzewing. Photo by Eleanor Dilley

This was followed by one of the highlights of the walk – seeing a Brush Bronzewing drinking from a puddle in the middle of the track.  With the sun behind them it gave all the photographers an excellent shot.  Despite the bush looking in fine condition birds were still scarce and apart from a couple of Eastern Spinebills and a Grey Fantail there was little to see.

Reaching the dam wall we saw Welcome Swallows over the water, more Musk Ducks and Cormorants, Masked Lapwings, Magpie Larks, Wood Ducks on the grassland and a Common Bronzewing.  

Musk Duck, male. Photo by Steve Hoptroff
Little Eagle and Australian Magpie. Photo by Steve Hoptroff

This was followed by another highlight when a Little Eagle was spotted being harassed by two Magpies. This pale morph Little Eagle provided us all with excellent views sit circled overhead, continuously chased by the Magpies. Walking along the lake’s edge saw us pick up a pair of Pacific Black Ducks, Purple Swamphens, more Cormorants and Silver Gulls.

Little Eagle. Photo by Eleanor Dilley
Australasian Swamphen. Photo by Eleanor Dilley

After lunch, a short walk along Logans Track resulted in a Crested Pigeon and at least three Eastern Yellow Robins being added to the list.  Returning to the carpark we found another pair of Tawny Frogmouths in a tree very close to where we had lunch.

A total of forty species for the day was a fair result considering the time of year and because it was such a lovely day there were large numbers of bike riders and walkers all along the track, ensuring the birds were staying further into the bush, making birding that much more difficult.



Beginners Outing to Braeside Park

26 March 2022
Leaders: Hazel and Alan Veeveres
Species count: 56

Thirty members assembled at the Southern Carpark in perfect weather conditions: sunny, light winds and not too hot. Soon after commencing the walk towards the  wetlands, a very well camouflaged Tawny Frogmouth was spotted in one of the gum trees. It gave everyone a good view and posed for many photographs before we moved on. 

Tawny Frogmouth. Photo by Eleanor Dilley
Pink-eared Ducks with chicks. Photo by Bevan Hood

On the first pond a pair of Pink-eared Ducks was seen carefully shepherding their eight newly-hatched ducklings from one safe place to another. On the shore were a pair of Masked Plovers which dwarfed a nearby Black-fronted Dotterel, as did three Royal Spoonbills which were feeding in the background. The Dotterel was the first of many to be seen during the morning walk.

Black-fronted Dotterels. Photo by Steve Hoptroff
Australian White Ibis. Photo by Eleanor Dilley

Continuing clockwise around the ponds some Australian White Ibis and many more waterbirds were seen. These included several more of the common Duck species, Australian Pelicans, Little Pied and Little Black Cormorants and Australasian Darters. 

Australian Pelicans. Photo by Bevan Hood
Pink-eared Duck, Eurasian Coot and Chestnut Teal. Photo by Steve Hoptroff
Little Black Cormorant and Australasian Darter. Photo by Eleanor Dilley
Little Pied Cormorant. Photo by Eleanor Dilley

At the far end of the wetlands a Black-shouldered Kite perched on top of a dead tree, leaving it several times for short hunting trips before returning to the roost. On one such occasion it became involved in a fracas with a much larger Brown Goshawk, effectively chasing it away. 

Black-shouldered Kite. Photo by Steve Hoptroff
Black-shouldered Kite. Photo by Eleanor Dilley

Several bushbirds were also seen in this area, as well as on the return track, including Grey Butcherbird, European Goldfinch, Superb Fairy-wren and Grey Fantail.

Grey Butcherbird. Photo by Bevan Hood
Common Bronzewing. Photo by Eleanor Dilley

After lunch most of the members drove to the northern end of Braeside and parked in the Pelican Carpark. A brief visit to the Visitor Centre was made so that the group could see more of the park’s raptors, albeit stuffed, before setting off on the Heathland Trail. A female Common Bronzewing feeding on the path did not seem threatened by our presence and walked across into the sunshine so that her wonderful feathers shone brightly. On reaching the ponds a few more Ducks were seen, along with Purple Swamphens and Long-necked Turtles. An Echidna was rescued from some children who were poking it with a stick, and then more small bushbirds were spotted. Another new species for the afternoon was a Pied Currawong which was heard calling in the distance.

The beautiful weather and abundant birdlife made this a most enjoyable excursion with 56 species recorded on the day.

Thanks to Eleanor Dilley, Steve Hoptroff and Bevan Hood for providing the photographs.

Weekdays Outing to Pound Bend

8 February 2022
Leaders: Hazel and Alan Veevers
Species count: 36

Thirty members gathered at Pound Bend on a hot sunny morning, admiring the many Parrots and Kookaburras in the picnic area. Walking the river track, upstream from the carpark, a Little Pied Cormorant fishing in the river was an early point of interest. 

Laughing Kookaburra. Photo by Eleanor Dilley
Galahs. Photo by Kathie Thomas

As the vegetation became denser many small birds could be heard and, although hard to see, Silvereyes, Grey Fantails, Yellow-faced and White-naped Honeyeaters were soon identified.

Little Pied Cormorant. Photo by Eleanor Dilley

Black Ducks and Dusky Moorhens were seen on the river along with a large-tailed Water Dragon which was sunning itself on a rock by the opposite bank.

White-naped Honeyeaters. Photo by Eleanor Dilley

Two ladies bathing in the river further along seemed unaware of a Tiger Snake swimming beside them!

Tiger Snake. Photo by Kathie Thomas

Water Dragon. Photo by Alan Veevers

An Eastern Yellow Robin, a pair of White-eared Honeyeaters, several Spotted Pardalotes and an immature Golden Whistler were observed beside the track.

Eastern Yellow Robin. Photo by Eleanor Dilley
Eastern Yellow Robin. Photo by Kathie Thomas
Spotted Pardalote. Photo by Steve Hoptroff

Unfortunately, one of the ladies at the rear of the group became unwell and subsequently fainted. Fortunately, Alan was nearby and provided first aid. As she was recovering three other members kindly volunteered their assistance, and all four helped to get her back to the carpark.  After resting, she and her car were taken home, by two of our volunteers, to be met by an awaiting friend.

Further along the track the vegetation thinned out and Noisy Miners began to dominate. After reaching the grassed area at the end of the track members retraced their steps along by the river, enjoying several more good sightings, including Crimson Rosella, Superb Fairy-wrens and Welcome Swallows. In the picnic area Black-faced Cuckoo Shrikes were heard but not seen.

Sacred Kingfisher. Photo by Steve Hoptroff
Australasian Darter. Photo by Steve Hoptroff

After lunch a short walk was taken towards the tunnel where many visitors were sunbathing and cooling-off in the water. Not surprisingly, no further bird species were seen there!  At this point the bird count was 34 species. Two of the members who had assisted Alan, thereby missing out on part of the morning walk, decided to stay behind after the formal closure and re-walk the river track. They photographed 2 extra birds; a Sacred Kingfisher and a female Australasian Darter (included above) – a just reward for the kindness they had shown earlier in the day! Thus, the group recorded a total of 36 species for the day.

Beginners Outing to Newport Lakes and Jawbone Reserve

27 November 2021
Leaders: Hazel and Alan Veevers
Species count: 56

Thirty-five members assembled at Newport Lakes, delighted to be able to meet again after many months being unable to do so, due to Covid restrictions. The weather conditions were fine but windy which caused some of the birds to seek shelter. The vegetation around the reserve was looking lush with many Eucalypts flowering profusely. Also, there was a lot of water in the lakes following the winter rains.

Two early sightings were of a Sacred Kingfisher and a female Rufous Whistler. Around the lakes dozens of Australian Reed-Warblers were very vocal, but extremely hard to see! There were few ducks or other waterbirds on the lakes and ponds. One Hardhead and a single Little Black Cormorant with a few Grebes, both Australasian and Hoary-headed. 

In the sheltered area of the Amphitheatre, birds were easier to find. An immature Golden Whistler and a Willie Wagtail on a nest were of special interest. Then, suddenly, “bird of the morning” was spotted by a new member – a Nankeen Night-Heron perched low under foliage just above the creek. 

A bird call at lunchtime recorded 33 species for Newport Lakes.

Members then drove down Maddox Road to the shore where there were fewer birds than expected. A single Pied Oystercatcher was on the breakwater along with a few Cormorants and Silver Gulls. Several Black Swans were on the bay. No small waders could be seen along the shoreline. A highlight was the sighting of an immature Black-shouldered Kite, perched behind a bush, sheltering from the wind. Walking beside the creek a Black-winged Stilt with an injured leg was busy feeding in the shallows. 

Members followed the track through Jawbones Reserve where there were fewer ducks than on previous visits. However, there were several Great Crested Grebes, some Blue-billed Ducks, and more Little Black, Little Pied and Pied Cormorants. Little Grassbirds were calling from the reeds along with many more Australian Reed Warblers. 

Dusky Moorhens and Purple Swamphens with tiny chicks also attracted some interest. On the return walk to the cars an Australian Hobby flew overhead, and a small group of Superb Fairy-wrens foraged beside the track. 

A few Common Greenfinches were seen feeding in their regular place and a Singing Honeyeater seemed to pose for a photo just before we finished. Three Australian Pelicans flying overhead were a fitting finale to a most enjoyable excursion.

42 species were recorded for the Jawbones Reserve, with the total for the day being 56.

View bird list for the day:

Beginners Outing to Braeside Park

27 March 2021
Leaders: Hazel and Alan Veevers
Photographer: Eleanor Dilley
Species count: 57
Dusky Moorhen

Twenty-three members gathered at the Southern Carpark in light rain and observed a small flock of Red-rumped Parrots at the top of a dead tree. Noisy Miners were evident throughout the park making it challenging to find any smaller bushbirds. Walking clockwise around the wetlands, we were delighted to find a lot of bird life on the water. This despite the noise from major roadworks along the perimeter of the park. A lone Dusky Moorhen, hiding in the reeds, watched as three Purple Swamphens marched imperiously by.

Purple Swamphens
Blue-billed Duck (m)

Nine different duck species were seen, with several (male) Blue-billed ducks being the highlight.

Great Egret

Numerous Australasian Darters, Australian Pelicans, a Great Egret and a Royal Spoonbill were among the other waterbirds seen.

Australasian Darters
Australian Pelican

There was great excitement when a Grey Goshawk in the White Morph was found, perched on a stump further along the track. Members approached cautiously and were rewarded with great views of this magnificent raptor.

Grey Goshawk White Morph

Soon afterwards a Swamp Harrier flew across the area causing a great commotion amongst the other birds. A few people saw an unusual parrot flying fast yet gracefully over the Park, first one way then back again in the opposite direction. Photographic evidence enabled it to be identified as a Superb Parrot (most likely an aviary escapee?).

Superb Parrot

By this time, the rain had eased and gradually the sun appeared. It was good to see that the glass in the bird-hide had been cleaned, enabling members to get great views of a pair of Pink-eared Ducks with several fluffy youngsters just outside the window.

Pink-eared Ducks with chicks

A further highlight from the hide occurred when a Brown Goshawk landed on a nearby branch. The next stop was at a smaller pond where more than a dozen cormorants were perched on a fallen log and a large vertical stag provided a resting place for yet more Australasian Darters.

Little Pied Cormorants

Lunch was eaten back near the cars after which most of the members drove to the northern end of the park and took a short walk along the Heathland Trail. Near the children’s playground two well camouflaged Tawny Frogmouths were located perched in a track-side tree not far above head height. Very few other bushbirds were seen, presumably due to the ever-present bullying Noisy Miners. 

Crested Pigeon

Two Crested Pigeons were found sunning themselves on the grass beside the path back towards the cars. The Tawny Frogmouths were again much admired as we passed by them again. One of them gave us a large yawn, as if to bid us goodbye, revealing the bright yellow inside of its beak. 

Tawny Frogmouth

This concluded a most rewarding and enjoyable day with a total of 57 species recorded.

A huge thankyou to Eleanor Dilley who, in rain or shine, captured all the images in the Report.

View the complete bird list:

Beginners Outing to Pound Bend

22 February 2020
Leaders: Hazel and Alan Veevers; Species count: 39
Photographs by Eleanor Dilley

Australasian Darter, male - Eleanor Dilley
Australasian Darter (male)

Perfect weather conditions for birdwatching – sunny, little wind and temperatures in the low 20s – greatly added to the enjoyment for the 38 members who attended the outing to Pound Bend.

Sulphur-crested Cockatoo - Eleanor Dilley
Sulphur-crested Cockatoo

From the carpark several parrot species were heard calling loudly, at times drowning out the efforts of the leaders to explain things, Sulphur-crested Cockatoos were the major culprits!  Rainbow Lorikeets were also plentiful, with the bright sun showing up their brilliant colours.

Rainbow Lorikeets - Eleanor Dilley
Rainbow Lorikeets

Walking along the river track it was pleasing to see several Eastern Yellow Robins and a pair of White-throated Treecreepers as well as numerous Grey Fantails and Superb Fairy-wrens.

Eastern Yellow Robin - Eleanor Dilley
Eastern Yellow Robin

White-throated Treecreeper - Eleanor Dilley
White-throated Treecreeper

Several ducks were on the river, including a pair of Chestnut Teal which is a very unusual sighting in this location. There were also three Little Pied Cormorants, one perched and others feeding in the river.

Chestnut Teal (male and female)
Chestnut Teal (male and female)

Little Pied Cormorant - Eleanor Dilley
Little Pied Cormorant

A Tawny Frogmouth perched close to the track with its beak thrust in the air in camouflage pose was a delight to all, especially the photographers. There were fewer birds to be found after the track left the riverside, heading for the higher, drier ground. Laughing Kookaburra and Magpie Lark were amongst the few species seen there. As the return track approached the river the pleasing sound of small birds could again be heard and Grey Shrike-thrush was added to the list.

Tawny Frogmouth - Eleanor Dilley
Tawny Frogmouth

Lunch was eaten near the carpark and surprisingly no birds arrived to steal the sandwiches!  After birdcall about half the group walked along the river track towards the tunnel and they were delighted to see a magnificent Australasian Darter perched on a log in the river with its deep chestnut breast shining in the sun. Members also enjoyed watching numerous Welcome Swallows flying in and out of the tunnel.  A total of 39 species was recorded for the day which was a reasonable tally for this time of year.

Many thanks, once again, to Eleanor Dilley, who provided all the above photographs.

View complete bird list: BM Feb 2020 Bird List Pound Bend

 

Beginners Outing to Banyule Flats

25 January 2020
Leaders: Hazel and Alan Veevers; Species count: 54
Photographs by Eleanor Dilley

Common Bronzewing - Eleanor Dilley
Common Bronzewing (f)

Parking at Banyule Flats was even more chaotic than usual as the whole carpark was sealed off for resurfacing so parking spaces had to be found in the surrounding streets. Whilst waiting for everyone to arrive, Musk Lorikeets were seen feeding in a callistemon tree and a Black-faced Cuckoo-shrike flew overhead.

Black-faced Cuckoo-shrike - Eleanor Dilley
Black-faced Cuckoo-shrike

Once assembled, the group set off to the Lagoon where they were rewarded with many interesting sightings.

Red-rumped Parrots f and m - Eleanor Dilley
Red-rumped Parrots (f and m)

There were male and female Red-rumped Parrots; a pair of Sacred Kingfishers flying up and down from a tree on the opposite bank to snatch insects from the water; Pink-eared Ducks and Pacific Black Ducks, both with young; a Tree Martin perched amongst many Welcome Swallows on top of an old dead water-bound tree; four large Cygnets without any adult Black Swans to supervise them; and, finally, both Hoary-headed and Australasian Grebes.

Pink-eared Duck with chicks - Eleanor Dilley
Pink-eared Duck with chicks

The day’s highlight occurred when a Nankeen Night-Heron suddenly flew, right to left, across the lagoon giving everyone a great view. Members then walked to the river track where there were several small bush birds including Red-browed Finch, Eastern Yellow Robin and White-browed Scrubwren. The only raptors for the day were two Brown Goshawks seen near the river.

Nankeen Night-Heron - Eleanor Dilley
Nankeen Night Heron

Close to the windmill a Sacred Kingfisher was calling loudly yet could not be seen, but a Male Mistletoebird kindly perched on a tall dead tree causing much excitement.  Members then headed back towards the carpark and watched a Grey Currawong being harassed by Australian Magpies.

Grey Currawong - Eleanor Dilley
Grey Currawong

The group then continued along the higher section of the Yarra Trail which gave good views over the Lagoon and a few more species were seen including both Little Pied and Little Black Cormorants perched on a dead log.

Little Black Little Pied Cormorants - Eleanor Dilley
Little Black and Little Pied Cormorants

About half the members then drove the short distance to Warringal Park for a well-earned lunch. A short stroll down Sills Track led to the Yarra River where two pairs of Australian Wood Ducks were very well camouflaged on a large tree branch high over the river.

Australian Wood Ducks - Eleanor Dilley
Australian Wood Ducks perched high over Yarra River

The nearby wetlands were visited next and found to be completely dry despite the recent rains. There were good views of a Common Bronzewing and a Grey Butcherbird beside the track. Sadly this area seemed to be overrun by Common Mynahs and Noisy Miners which were keeping all the smaller birds at bay.

Pacific Black Duckling - Eleanor Dilley
Pacific Black Duckling

A creditable total of 54 species was recorded for the day. It had been a most enjoyable outing in pleasant weather conditions. Many thanks, once again, to photographer Eleanor Dilley for providing all the above images.

View complete bird list: BM Jan 2020 Bird List Banyule Flats

Weekdays outing to Barry Road Grasslands, Galada Tamboore

19 November, 2019

New Holland Honeyeater - Katmun Loh.JPG
New Holland Honeyeater. Photo by Katmun Loh

The venue was unfamiliar to most of our members and we were extremely grateful that Jodi Jackson was available to lead us when circumstances prevented Bridget, our advertised leader, from attending.

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Golden-headed Cisticola - Bevan Hood
Golden-headed Cisticola. Photo by Bevan Hood

The weather was favourable, light clouds and breezes, so sunscreen rather than raincoats was advisable. Our group numbered twelve and car park birding was dominated by those introduced evils, the Common Starling and Common Myna. However Crested Pigeons and New Holland and White-plumed Honeyeaters were sighted with Red Wattlebirds calling and an occasional Willie Wagtail making an appearance.

Common Starling juvenile - Bevan Hood
Common Starling, juvenile. Photo by Bevan Hood

Walking the track toward the ‘rusty’ pedestrian bridge we encountered brief sightings and then heard the trills of a somewhat unexpected White-winged Triller. First at least two males were seen and then at least one female flew between trees. Quite a good start to the walk. Could it get better? We doubted it.

White-winged Triller - Katmun Loh
White-winged Triller. Photo by Katmun Loh

Approaching the bridge we found the traffic noise overwhelmed any bird calls present so it was eyes only. City views can be available from the bridge but today there was insufficient wind so smog cheated photographers of clear views.

Little Pied Cormorant - Katmun Loh
Little Pied Cormorant. Photo by Katmun Loh

Male and female Superb Fairy Wrens fluttered around each other near the low scrub and the call of a Eurasian Skylark was audible to many as we walked away from the bridge and freeway.

Group on viewing platform - Katmun Loh
Group on viewing platform. Photo by Katmun Loh

A viewing platform located by the Merri Creek adjoined the reedbed containing calling Australian Reed-Warblers and Little Grassbird (seen by a fortunate few). To maintain the grasslands requires intervention and we passed a small team spraying invading broad-leaved weeds.

Horsefields Bronze-Cuckoo - Katmun Loh
Horsfield’s Bronze-Cuckoo. Photo by Katmun Loh

The track passed a short distance from a wetland where the intrepid observers who braved potential snakes (none detected) were rewarded with Hardheads, Hoary-headed Grebe, Purple Swamphen and Dusky Moorhen.

Hardhead male - Bevan Hood
Hardhead, male. Photo by Bevan Hood

A highlight here was a Nankeen Night-Heron which flushed briefly and allowed everyone to see it.

Nankeen Night Heron - Katmun Loh
Nankeen Night-Heron. Photo by Katmun Loh

Continuing we often encountered Golden-headed Cisticolas rising from the grass and, on one much-appreciated occasion, perching on the grass stalk for a minute. Our only raptor, a Nankeen Kestrel, hovered characteristically over the grass.

Hovering Nankeen Kestrel - Katmun Loh
Nankeen Kestrel. Photo by Katmun Loh

Our track rose toward an escarpment. Here was the creek and denser bush and here we added Red-browed Finches and a couple of Grey Fantails.

Grey Fantail - Katmun Loh
Grey Fantail. Photo by Katmun Loh

By now the thought of lunch was attractive and the potential rock crossing at the end of the track seemed a very good place to turn back. On the return we encountered our only Spotted Pardalote calling and glimpsed Brown and Yellow-rumped Thornbills.

Galah - Bevan Hood
Galah. Photo by Bevan Hood

We would have covered at least 4 km and sitting for lunch was very pleasant, even more so when we did the bird call to find we had a list of 45 species. We thanked Jodi whole-heartedly for sharing her knowledge with us.

Diane Tweeddale, Coordinator BirdLife Melbourne weekdays outings

 

Beginners Outing to Cranbourne Botanical Gardens

26 October 2019
Leaders: Hazel and Alan Veevers; Species count: 53
All photographs by Eleanor Dilley

Little Pied Cormorant - Eleanor Dilley
Little Pied Cormorant

There was a challenging start to this excursion as members had to negotiate thousands (literally) of motorbikes assembling in Cranbourne for their annual cavalcade to the Grand Prix on Phillip Island. Furthermore, the weather conditions were far from ideal with very strong winds and heavy squally downpours throughout the day.

Common Bronzewing - Eleanor Dilley
Common Bronzewing

Setting out from the Stringybark Car Park a Golden Whistler could be heard calling but he was hard to see as he was very wisely tucked down in dense vegetation. Grey Fantails and Brown Thornbills were also sheltering in the thickets. A Pied Currawong on a nest and a Common Bronzewing in fine breeding plumage were seen early on. A highlight was seeing a Horsefield’s Bronze-Cuckoo and a male White-winged Triller on branches of the same dead tree.

Superb Fairy-wren - Eleanor Dilley
Superb Fairy-wren

There were several duck species on the wetlands including Chestnut Teal with ducklings, Grey Teal and Hardhead. A few Little Black Cormorants were swimming as were Hoary Headed Grebes, while both White-necked and White-faced Herons flew overhead.

White-necked Heron - Eleanor Dilley
White-necked Heron

On leaving the wetlands a Pallid Cuckoo was heard calling and was located in the distance on a dead branch low on a tree.

Pallid Cuckoo - Eleanor Dilley
Pallid Cuckoo

Several Swamp Wallabies were spotted keeping low profiles in the wet bracken. On returning to the cars another heavy downpour forced the members to use the information shelter for their picnic lunch.  An Eastern Yellow Robin was singing lustily as we ate and was eventually located in the nearby undergrowth.

Swamp Wallaby - Eleanor Dilley
Swamp Wallaby

Most of the group then drove to the Australian Garden which was looking very colourful with spring blossoms.  Nine additional species were found here including Dusky Woodswallow, Australasian Grebe, Little Pied Cormorant, Little Wattlebird and Silvereye.

Australasian Grebe - Eleanor Dilley
Australasian Grebe

Dusky Woodswallow - Eleanor Dilley
Dusky Woodswallow

A grand total of 53 species was recorded for the day, which was a very good result considering the weather conditions.  ur thanks go to Eleanor Dilley, our faithful photographer, who still managed to produce the excellent images in this Report despite the gale force winds and patchy rain!

 

 

Beginners Outing to Jells Park

24 August 2019
Leader: Robert Grosvenor
Attendees: 35; Species count: 52

Little Raven, Jells Park
Little Raven. Photo by Eleanor Dilley

While waiting for all attendees to arrive Eastern Rosella, Noisy Miner and White Ibis were all seen overhead but what was most surprising was the sight of a large hare which took off down the path near the car park.

Laughing Kookaburra - B Hood
Laughing Kookaburra. Photo by Bevan Hood

Eventually it was time to commence the walk by then we had 35 eager birders ready to go. It was a lovely sunny winter’s morning, only hampered by the strong, cold northerly wind.  A Laughing Kookaburra waited for us at the start of our walk.

Grey Butcherbird, Jells Park
Grey Butcherbird. Photo by Eleanor Dilley

A Striated Pardalote was calling in a large gum tree but proved impossible to see due to the windy conditions. Shortly into the walk we deviated from our planned route to try and find a Tawny Frogmouth which had been seen in the area. Although unsuccessful, we did find a Grey Fantail and a female Golden Whistler.  Some also had close views of a Grey Butcherbird.

Black-faced Cuckoo-shrike - B Hood
Black-faced Cuckoo-shrike. Photo by Bevan Hood

Back on track, many were fortunate to see a Spotted Pardalote flying into and out of its nest in the side of the creek. This was quickly followed by a Grey Shrike Thrush, a Black Faced Cuckoo Shrike, Brown Thornbill and a male Golden Whistler looking resplendent in the bright sunshine.

Pink-eared Duck, Jells Park
Pink-eared Duck. Photo by Eleanor Dilley

Eventually we arrived at the bird hide by the lake where Pink Eared Duck, Grey Teal and a few Freckled Ducks were seen together with hundreds of White Ibis, a Darter, Little Pied Cormorant, Eurasian Coot and both Hoary Headed and Australasian Grebes.

Little Pied Cormorant, Australian White Ibis, Dusky Moorhen, Eurasian Coot, Jells Park
Little Pied Cormorant, Australian White Ibis, Dusky Moorhen, Eurasian Coot. Photo by Eleanor Dilley

Australasian Darter - B Hood
Australasian Darter. Photo by Bevan Hood

Further down the track, a solitary Chestnut Teal was found as well as a pair of Pacific Black ducks, Purple Swamp hens and Dusky Moorhens.

Chestnut Teal male - B Hood
Chestnut Teal, male. Photo by Bevan Hood

A single Australian Pelican was seen flying above the lake, and was later seen on the water.

Australian Pelican - B Hood
Australian Pelican. Photo by Bevan Hood

When we reached the lake again some eagle-eyed birders managed to find a single Royal Spoonbill amongst the many hundreds of White Ibis. A pair of Little Ravens watched us pass by on our way out of the sanctuary.

Australian Pelican, Jells Park
Australian Pelican. Photo by Eleanor Dilley

Following our walk around the lake, we picked up Wood Duck, Willy Wagtail and a White-faced Heron before we returned for lunch.

Australasian Swamphen, Jells Park
Australasian Swamphen. Photo by Eleanor Dilley

Over lunch Galahs, Sulphur-crested Cockatoos and Eastern Rosellas were seen.

White-faced Heron - B Hood
White-faced Heron. Photo by Bevan Hood

After lunch with a slightly reduced number we crossed the bridge and headed north towards Nortons Park. Although the strong wind made birding difficult in this exposed area we managed an extra seven species for the day with Great Egret, Cattle Egret, Straw-necked Ibis, Silver Gull, Blackbird, Indian Myna and Starling all seen, giving a grand total for the day of 52 species.

A good total for the conditions and a good walk for the birders.

View complete bird list: Bird List Jells Park 2019