Tag Archives: New Holland Honeyeater

Weekdays Outing to Newport Lakes and Jawbone Reserve

5 April 2017
mix of birds on an inlet - Graeme Dean
On an islet in Jawbone – Immature Little Pied Cormorant, Royal Spoonbill, (partly hidden) Chestnut Teal and a Little Pied Cormorant. Photo by Graeme Dean

The morning was perfect for birding, calm, clear and mild, as our 19 assembled. Our number included Jennifer, a birder over from the USA for a month.

Crested Pigeon - D Tweeddale
Crested Pigeon. Photo by Diane Tweeddale

Hazel Veevers led the group once we could discipline ourselves to leave the car park where, as usual, the birding was rewarding and effortless. There were Red Wattlebirds, Crested Pigeons, Superb Fairy-wrens, Musk Lorikeets, New Holland Honeyeaters and House Sparrows in numbers with Rainbow Lorikeets, Little Ravens and Magpie-larks somewhat fewer.

New Holland Honeyeater - Graeme Dean
New Holland Honeyeater. Photo by Graeme Dean

The main lake had both Australasian and Hoary-headed Grebes in considerable numbers. Welcome Swallows soared above the canopy and over the water.

Welcome Swallow - Graeme Dean
‘Belligerent’ Welcome Swallow. Photo by Graeme Dean

Walking further we noted the amphitheatre was very popular with Superb Fairy-wrens and honeyeaters foraging in and under the trees. The only raptor of the day was recorded here – two Brown Goshawks interacted very briefly before disappearing behind the trees. Eurasian Coots and Purple Swamphens were present on all lakes but Dusky Moorhens were only present later at Jawbone. Spotted Pardalotes called and finally one allowed us to glimpse him among the foliage, delighting all and especially those who hadn’t seen one before. Flowering trees each attracted several species of bird and therefore also attracted the attention of birdwatchers.

Common Greenshank - Black-winged Stilt - Graeme Dean
Common Greenshank and Black-winged Stilt. Photo by Graeme Dean

Back for lunch which was interrupted with a quiet call of “Robin”. The “sparrow” on the path was actually a female Flame Robin which stayed around long enough for all to achieve good views. The lakes reserve had a bird count of 34 species.

Crossing at Newport Lake 2 - D Tweeddale
Crossing at Newport Lake. Photo by Diane Tweeddale

We drove down to Jawbone where the bird count mounted quickly. Waterbirds were numerous though a scope was an asset when identifying those on the distant sand bar. A highlight here was an Arctic Jaeger unsuccessfully attacking a Silver Gull and being harassed in its turn.

Red-kneed Dotterel - Graeme Dean
Red-kneed Dotterel. Photo by Graeme Dean

Black Swans and Silver Gulls were numerous but there were other species in smaller numbers – Pied, Little Pied and Little Black Cormorants, Royal Spoonbills, Australian Pied Oystercatchers, Australian White Ibis, White-faced Heron, Crested Terns, the list continued with both Grey and Chestnut Teal, Common Greenshanks and a small flock of Red-kneed Dotterels quite close to the hide.

Pond by housing at Jawbone
Pond by housing at Jawbone. Photo by Diane Tweeddale

We counted nine duck species as well as the ubiquitous grebes and numbers of swans on the pond near the houses. It was good to record Pink-eared, Bluebill, Australasian Shoveler and Musk Duck as well as the more familiar species.

Pink-eared Ducks - Graeme Dean
Pink-eared Ducks. Photo by Graeme Dean

A Great Egret by the far bank was clearly having success with its fishing and a small flotilla of grebes moved closer to it, possibly to join the hunt.

Great Egret - Graeme Dean
Great Egret. Photo by Graeme Dean.

Time to call it a day and count the Jawbone species. Here we recorded 56 species and calculated the day’s total as 64 species. It had been a good day’s birding with good views of many species and we thanked Hazel for introducing some and reintroducing others to this area.

Diane Tweeddale coordinator BirdLife Melbourne weekdays outings

Weekday outing to Altona area

6 September 2016
spotted-pardalote-male-kathy-zonneville
Spotted Pardalote, male. Photo by Kathy Zonneville

The weather was perfect, mild, sunny and calm as 28 people gathered in the farthest car park. Seven of these were young people from the Green Army planning to acquire bird ID skills and we were happy to assist with loaned binoculars, field guides and advice.

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Superb Fairy-wren, male. Photo by Kathy Zonneville

The immediate area near the car park was well populated with Crested Pigeons, magpies, Superb Fairy-wrens, Galahs and Red Wattlebirds while a few Red-browed Finches were less easy to find though one was sighted carrying a long grass stalk as nesting material.

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Red-browed Finch. Photo by Marilyn Ellis

There were Willie Wagtails and Grey Fantails with Little Ravens calling and flying overhead. Introduced birds were also present – flocks of Common Starlings, some Spotted Doves, fewer Common Mynas with occasional Common Blackbird calling. Small birds among the denser foliage included Spotted Pardalotes and Silvereyes.

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Silvereye. Photo by Marilyn Ellis

The drainage channel and catchment ponds initially looked empty but persistence revealed Chestnut Teal and Pacific Black Duck and a further bankside walk added White-faced Heron, croaking as they flew near, and Eurasian Coot and Dusky Moorhen.

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White-faced Heron. Photo by Marilyn Ellis

Little Grassbirds called plaintively just after we had identified a Horsefield’s Bronze-Cuckoo by its call. Much searching by many failed to repeat the brief sighting of a Spotless Crake. The Laverton Creek mouth area added Australian Pelican, Little Pied Cormorant and, initially, an extremely distant Great Egret. Then, closer to the group a second egret provided much better views.

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Little Pied Cormorant. Photo by Marilyn Ellis

The Bird of the Day arrived here – an immature White-bellied Sea-Eagle which flew toward us and then turned direction over our heads, giving great views to all those present. Another bird which proved most cooperative was a Singing Honeyeater which showed great loyalty to the bare dead tree on which it perched, returning there after many short flights and allowing excellent views.

white-plumed-honeyeater-marilyn-ellis
White-plumed Honeyeater. Photo by Marilyn Ellis

It joined Red Wattlebird and White-plumed and New Holland Honeyeaters on our list. The party divided on its way back to lunch and the car park but neither group added any species to an already impressive list.

new-holland-honeyeater-marilyn-ellis
New Holland Honeyeater. Photo by Marilyn Ellis

After lunch those who stayed on headed north, adding a Brown Falcon and a challenging Australasian Pipit while delighting in the White-fronted Chats on the low bushes. One photographer was recording a chat when another bird flew into the camera’s field. After taking many photos in the brief time available these were compared with field guides and finally we concluded that the intruding bird was a Jacky Winter. Definitely serendipity.

spotted-pardalote-female-marilyn-ellis
Spotted Pardalote, female. Photo by Marilyn Ellis

By the walk’s end we counted 60 species for the day and we thanked Gina Hopkins, our leader, for her preparation and enthusiasm which gave such a great result.

Diane Tweeddale, coordinator BirdLife Melbourne Weekdays Outings

You Yangs Birding and Boneseeding

4 June 2016
Text and photos by Merrilyn Serong
View from Valley Picnic Ground YY 2016 06 04 0632 800x600 M Serong
View from Valley Picnic Ground

An unexpected weather event in eastern Australia turned what otherwise might have been a fine, but cloudy day into one of intermittent drizzle. It’s not often that we see the ground wet at the You Yangs or water in the gutters beside the Great Circle Drive. The level of the dam near the park entrance was lower than I can remember it, but there was some water in other dams that were quite dry on our last visit. We heard frogs in a few places. Mosses, lichens, fungi and rock ferns were looking marvellous. The wet was not enough to deter the keen cyclists who frequent the park and it did not hamper the six of us on our quest to find birds and pull out boneseed. In these conditions the number of bird species recorded was lower than usual at a mere 24, but the damp ground made it easier to remove the weeds. The day remained pleasantly calm, and with coats on, we were not too cold.

We spent some time, as usual, in the area near the entrance and Park Office. Still no sign of the Tawny Frogmouths, which used to be so reliable here. Weebills were calling and foraging in the eucalypt canopy. An Eastern Yellow Robin posed close by for a moment. Lorikeets were heard briefly, but not seen. I think they were Musk. There seem to be fewer White-plumed Honeyeaters in this area than there were in the past, but more New Hollands. The latter were particularly abundant around the profusely flowering Hakea laurina bushes to the east of the dam. These plants from the south-west of Australia thrive in this area of the You Yangs.

Eastern Yellow Robin YY 2016 06 04 0599 800x600 M Serong
Eastern Yellow Robin

Morning tea was at the Valley Picnic Ground where we hoped for Boobooks, which are said to be there at times, and Tawny Frogmouths. We saw neither, but we did see numbers of Brown-headed Honeyeaters at the flowering eucalypts. Weebills were plentiful. Some of us saw a koala run across the road and disappear.

Amongst the bird species at Gravel Pit Tor were Crimson Rosella, White-throated Treecreeper, Eastern Yellow Robin, and Yellow and Brown Thornbills. A female Scarlet Robin was seen. There were two pairs of Scarlet Robins near here a couple of weeks ago on a finer day.

Scarlet Robin Gravel Pit Tor YY 2016 05 21 0083 800x800 M Serong
Scarlet Robin, Gravel Pit Tor

At lunch time we shared Fawcett’s Gully with a man who was using water colours to paint a scene of the area. The light rain was not helpful. Here there were also White-plumed and New Holland Honeyeaters, Crimson Rosellas, a White-throated Treecreeper and some frogs.

In mid to late afternoon we tackled a patch of medium-sized boneseed plants to the north of our official site. There were also several newly emerged boneseed plants still at the two-leaf stage. These were much easier to pull out. I found a bird’s leg-ring. It’s the type used on racing pigeons, so its wearer possibly provided a meal for a raptor.

New Holland Honeyeater in Hakea laurina YY 2016 06 04 0613 800x600 M Serong
New Holland Honeyeater in Hakea laurina

Towards the end of the day, when the last of us were preparing to leave our boneseeding site, a small flock of Varied Sittellas appeared together with a few Silvereyes. Soon after, we saw a Buff-rumped Thornbill. These added another three species to the day’s total. It was too dark by then for photos, so we’ll just have to remember them. One of the last bird sounds for the day was the mournful cry of White-winged Choughs. This nicely complemented the approaching night and continuing drizzle.

Many thanks to all participants and others who maintain an interest in the project.

The bird list for the day will be available at http://www.birdlifemelbourne.org.au/outings/site-lists/YouYangs%202016.html

More photos are on my website: http://www.timeinthebush.com/you-yangs-2016.html

Thank you

A special thank you to David McCarthy for his dedicated work in our YY boneseeding project. He has made a fantastic contribution over many years. David is no longer able to continue his involvement in boneseed removal, but will keep track of our progress by continuing to add our bird sightings to the data base.

Beginners Outing to Cranbourne Botanical Gardens

27 February 2016
Leaders: Hazel and Alan Veevers; Species count: 51

In pleasantly mild conditions 49 members gathered at the Stringybark Carpark and were pleased to observe several species of honeyeater in the nearby trees, including Brown-headed, New Holland and White-eared. The bush tracks leading to the wetlands were similarly rewarding, with Rufous Whistlers and an immature Shining Bronze-Cuckoo being among the more unusual sightings.

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New Holland Honeyeater (L) and Immature Shining Bronze-Cuckoo (R). Photographs by Kathy Zonnevylle

The water level at the wetlands was low resulting in fewer ducks than usual, though there was a White-faced Heron and both Hoary-headed and Australasian Grebes present. Two Whistling Kites were seen circling in the distance and an immature Laughing Kookaburra was making strange noises as he practised his cackle.

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Australasian Grebe (L). Photo by Kathy Zonnevylle. Southern Brown Bandicoot (R). Photo by Eleanor Dilley

Soon afterwards those lucky members at the front of the group saw a male Mistletoebird perched beside the track displaying his brilliant red breast and vent. There were good views of a pair of Eastern Yellow Robins and two Swamp Wallabies as the group returned to the carpark. In the information shelter a Southern Brown Bandicoot was feasting on a yellow jelly snake (clearly it had not read the notice saying they live on fungi and beetles!). The animal was without a tail, but in otherwise good condition and kept the members well entertained at lunchtime as it darted under chairs and between legs foraging for any interesting tit-bit.

Amongst the smaller bush-birds were several Spotted and Striated Pardalotes, and a lone Striated Thornbill graced us with its presence.

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Spotted Pardalote (L). Photo by Eleanor Dilley. Striated Thornbill (R). Photo by Kathy Zonnevylle

After lunch about half the group continued on to the Australian Gardens and, before entering, walked up to the Trig Lookout. No additional species were seen from the top, though two extras for the bird list: Eastern Spinebill and European Goldfinch, were spotted in the Gardens. Members enjoyed walking round this area and observing the progress since the last visit, though it would appear that the birds prefer the wild bushland area to the native gardens. Fifty-one bird species were recorded for this visit – exactly the same total as for our last visit in July 2014.

See the full bird list: BM February 2016 Bird List Cranbourne Botanical Gardens