Tag Archives: White-faced Heron

Beginners Outing to Lillydale Lake

25 March 2017
Leaders: Hazel and Alan Veevers; Species Count: 50
All photographs by Alan Veevers
Eurasian Coot A Veevers IMG_3429
Eurasian Coot

Many regulars were unable to come to the outing, thus reducing the attendance to 22 including five first-timers. These, however, were to enjoy an exceptionally good day! After viewing the resident Australasian Darters from the lakeside track, the group began the walk alongside the stream that delivers water to the lake from the upstream wetlands.

Azure Kingfishers A Veevers IMG_3491
Azure Kingfishers

To everyone’s delight a pair of Azure Kingfishers was seen perched on a horizontal log, their brilliant iridescent colours shining in the low sun. The pair was observed for several minutes, slowly making their way along the channel, pausing now and then to preen or forage. This was a very hard act to follow! There were few waterbirds on the wetlands, mainly Dusky Moorhens and Eurasian Coots. Two Little Pied Cormorants perched high on a dead tree.

Little Pied Cormorants A Veevers IMG_3454
Little Pied Cormorants

Heading further upstream towards the Hull Road Wetlands, Eastern and Crimson Rosellas together with Rainbow Lorikeets were high in the trees whilst Superb Fairy-wrens and Grey Fantails were lower down in the bushes.

Rainbow Lorikeet A Veevers IMG_3481
Rainbow Lorikeet

Again there were few birds on the wetlands, but a pair of Wedge-tailed Eagles flew overhead in a clear blue sky and an Eastern Yellow Robin and New Holland Honeyeaters were seen in the bush. On the return track to the carpark, a pair of Tawny Frogmouths was spotted, very well camouflaged in the high branches of a tree.

Tawny Frogmouth A Veevers IMG_3443
Tawny Frogmouth

Eventually all the beginners managed to see them and some were awestruck by the apparent impossibility of ever finding any for themselves.

Australasian Darter A Veevers IMG_3487
Australasian Darter

Lunch was taken back near the main lake and members were again entertained by the reappearance of the pair of Wedge-tailed Eagles. A short afternoon walk was taken in the region of the wetlands and unbelievably the two Azure Kingfishers were still in the same section of the little creek! Everyone was able to enjoy further views of them at very close quarters. From beside the wetlands there were better views of the Australian Darters that seemed unperturbed by the young Scouts who were paddling canoes near to their roosts. Others floated gracefully above, clearly showing their gliding profile.

Welcome Swallow A Veevers IMG_3425
Welcome Swallow

Welcome Swallows perched on the lookout rails, Silvereyes flitted through the shrubs and a White-faced Heron stalked prey at the edge of the water.

White-faced Heron A Veevers IMG_3451
White-faced Heron

A grand total of 50 species was recorded for the day, but the abiding memory for most members will be of a pair of beautiful shining blue birds fearlessly displaying at close quarters.

See the full bird list for the day: BM Mar 2017 Bird List Lillydale Lake

 

Weekday outing to Altona area

6 September 2016
spotted-pardalote-male-kathy-zonneville
Spotted Pardalote, male. Photo by Kathy Zonneville

The weather was perfect, mild, sunny and calm as 28 people gathered in the farthest car park. Seven of these were young people from the Green Army planning to acquire bird ID skills and we were happy to assist with loaned binoculars, field guides and advice.

superb-fairy-wren-male-kathy-zonneville
Superb Fairy-wren, male. Photo by Kathy Zonneville

The immediate area near the car park was well populated with Crested Pigeons, magpies, Superb Fairy-wrens, Galahs and Red Wattlebirds while a few Red-browed Finches were less easy to find though one was sighted carrying a long grass stalk as nesting material.

red-browed-finch-marilyn-ellis
Red-browed Finch. Photo by Marilyn Ellis

There were Willie Wagtails and Grey Fantails with Little Ravens calling and flying overhead. Introduced birds were also present – flocks of Common Starlings, some Spotted Doves, fewer Common Mynas with occasional Common Blackbird calling. Small birds among the denser foliage included Spotted Pardalotes and Silvereyes.

silvereye-marilyn-ellis
Silvereye. Photo by Marilyn Ellis

The drainage channel and catchment ponds initially looked empty but persistence revealed Chestnut Teal and Pacific Black Duck and a further bankside walk added White-faced Heron, croaking as they flew near, and Eurasian Coot and Dusky Moorhen.

white-faced-heron-marilyn-ellis
White-faced Heron. Photo by Marilyn Ellis

Little Grassbirds called plaintively just after we had identified a Horsefield’s Bronze-Cuckoo by its call. Much searching by many failed to repeat the brief sighting of a Spotless Crake. The Laverton Creek mouth area added Australian Pelican, Little Pied Cormorant and, initially, an extremely distant Great Egret. Then, closer to the group a second egret provided much better views.

little-pied-cormorant-marilyn-ellis
Little Pied Cormorant. Photo by Marilyn Ellis

The Bird of the Day arrived here – an immature White-bellied Sea-Eagle which flew toward us and then turned direction over our heads, giving great views to all those present. Another bird which proved most cooperative was a Singing Honeyeater which showed great loyalty to the bare dead tree on which it perched, returning there after many short flights and allowing excellent views.

white-plumed-honeyeater-marilyn-ellis
White-plumed Honeyeater. Photo by Marilyn Ellis

It joined Red Wattlebird and White-plumed and New Holland Honeyeaters on our list. The party divided on its way back to lunch and the car park but neither group added any species to an already impressive list.

new-holland-honeyeater-marilyn-ellis
New Holland Honeyeater. Photo by Marilyn Ellis

After lunch those who stayed on headed north, adding a Brown Falcon and a challenging Australasian Pipit while delighting in the White-fronted Chats on the low bushes. One photographer was recording a chat when another bird flew into the camera’s field. After taking many photos in the brief time available these were compared with field guides and finally we concluded that the intruding bird was a Jacky Winter. Definitely serendipity.

spotted-pardalote-female-marilyn-ellis
Spotted Pardalote, female. Photo by Marilyn Ellis

By the walk’s end we counted 60 species for the day and we thanked Gina Hopkins, our leader, for her preparation and enthusiasm which gave such a great result.

Diane Tweeddale, coordinator BirdLife Melbourne Weekdays Outings

Weekdays Outing to Pipemakers Park, Maribyrnong

11 July 2016
Leader: Pat Bingham

 

Pacific Black Duck - Marilyn Ellis
Pacific Black Duck. Photo by Marilyn Ellis

On a very cold morning, in a howling gale but bright sunshine, 15 members and three visitors from Asia met on the banks of the Maribyrnong River to go birdwatching. Quite mad in those weather conditions!

Before we left the car park, we had THE BIRD OF THE DAY – a lone Swift Parrot, heavily disguising itself in dense foliage but popping its unmistakeable red face out from time to time and, turning upside down, showing us it’s pinky vent and long tail.

Swift Parrot - Danika Sanderson.JPG
Swift Parrot. Photo by Danika Sanderson

It was a new bird for many of the group and we had some difficulty in persuading our visitors what a rare sighting it was. It was hard to turn our backs on the rarity, watch the Whistling Kite flying upriver and, then ourselves, go downstream into the wind.

We followed the Maribyrnong Trail past Frogs Hollow Wetland (well named – there were many Common Froglets calling) and found Red-browed Finches on the fence and Superb Fairy-wrens on the grass.  Jack’s Canal yielded Dusky Moorhens and Purple Swamphens, Australasian Grebe and we heard, above the gale, the plaintiff call of the Little Grassbird from the reed bed.

Australasian Grebe - Marilyn Ellis
Australasian Grebe. Photo by Marilyn Ellis

The waves were pretty choppy on the lake in Burndap Park but we had good views of both Grey and Chestnut Teal, and Hoary-headed Grebe.

Chestnut Teal - Danika Sanderson
Chestnut Teal. Photo by Danika Sanderson

In the most sheltered corner of the lake we found White-faced Heron, Great Egret and Pacific Black Duck roosting.

White-faced Heron - Marilyn Ellis.jpg
White-faced Heron. Photo by Marilyn Ellis

On a floating platform on the adjacent river we were able to distinguish the characteristics differentiating Little Black from Little Pied Cormorants and from a young Darter sharing the same platform.  We had Wood Ducks and Eurasian Coots grazing on the grass of the riverbank and Crested Pigeons & Red-rumped Parrots picking up seeds from the path.

Immature Australasian Darter - Danika Sanderson
Immature Australasian Darter. Photo by Danika Sanderson

We went back to the car park for lunch where a Black-shouldered Kite hunted overhead, 30 Galahs flew by and Yellow-rumped Thornbills tinkled from the adjacent grassland.  After lunch we crossed the river and explored the city side parkland.

Great Egret - Marilyn Ellis
Great Egret. Photo by Marilyn Ellis

In flowering Ironbarks on the golf course we had good views of Rainbow and Musk Lorikeets and were able to compare their markings and calls.  We found a pair of Long-billed Corellas exploring a tree hollow and saw an old Mudlark nest.  Heading further east towards the Walter Street Reserve we recorded Eastern Rosellas and both White-plumed and New Holland Honeyeaters.  A newly-planted wetland area adjacent to a housing development had already been discovered by ducks and a cormorant but the only new species for the day that we found there were House Sparrows and Common Starlings. Revisiting that area in the future, when the plantings were better established would probably prove more fruitful.  Buff-banded Rail has been recorded in the past from the creek that drains the area (sadly now only a concrete drain).

the group - Marilyn Ellis.jpg
The group. Photo by Marilyn Ellis

At Bird Call, we listed 48 species which, given the persistent cold wind, increasingly dull day and exposed site was a good total and all participants agreed they had enjoyed themselves in an area few had visited before.